‘The New Yorker’ video interview with Jemima

‘The New Yorker’ video interview with Jemima

A short and lovely interview by magazine The New Yorker, view it below:

Video Link: Video link: Interviews - The New Yorker

New music video directed by Jemima – Studmuffin96

New music video directed by Jemima – Studmuffin96

Jemima has done it again! She has directed yet another music video and it’s for our favorite Alex Cameron’s song Studmuffin96. No words needed, just watch it.

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Jemima discusses “Wild Honey Pie!” in new video interview

Jemima discusses “Wild Honey Pie!” in new video interview

Here is a new video interview by U Interview which they posted some days ago. Jemima speaks about her movie Wild Honey Pie! and also lets us know what was the most memorable moment while filming.

While filming Wild Honey Pie, a film about a couple struggling in their marriage, Jemima Kirke was most moved during a scene in which her character, Gillian, is watching her own play.

“[For] someone who’s so used to things being negative about them, that kind of stress and that sort of self loathing or whatever is never gonna move them as much as them achieving something,” Kirke told uInterview exclusively at South by Southwest in Austin. “That revealed something to me about her, which is that she probably doesn’t realize how capable she is and how professional she is. That’s, I don’t know why, but that moved me, watching it.”

Kirke said her character struggles very loudly and lives her life in a public way.

“She is someone who makes mistakes and figures things out right in the moment,” Kirke said. “Therein lies sort of her strength and her vulnerability.”

Kirke said that it is difficult to look at marriage from whole angles because marriage itself is an antiquated, man manmade concept.

“We find [Gillian] at a point in her life, which is very normal, where her marriage isn’t working,” Kirke said. “She chooses to stay in the end despite the fact that it makes absolutely no sense, you know? It is quite crazy that we stay married when we’re miserable, and then you just have to sort of weigh out, is this worth it? And sometimes it is and sometimes it isn’t.”

The British actress also had advice for married couples who may be struggling.

“I think it’s important to remember, if you’re married and you love the person you’re with, that you can come back from these mistakes, you know?” Kirke said. “There’s room to screw up, and if there isn’t then it’s just not gonna work.”

Read all of uInterview’s exclusive interview with Kirke below.

Can you describe your character in the film?

Jemima Kirke: She is someone who struggles very loudly and is sort of living her life in a very sort of non-private way. She is someone who makes mistakes and figures things out right in the moment. Therein lies sort of her strength and her vulnerability.

What struggle does your character face in the film?

JK: I think if you’re someone who looks at things from whole angles then traditions like marriage are going to be difficult because there’s so much about marriage that’s antiquated and sort of man made and not human. We find her at a point in her life, which is very normal, where her marriage isn’t working.

She chooses to stay in the end despite the fact that it makes absolutely no sense, you know? It is quite crazy that we stay married when we’re miserable, and then you just have to sort of weigh out, is this worth it? And sometimes it is and sometimes it isn’t.

I think it’s important to remember, if you’re married and you love the person you’re with, that you can come back from these mistakes, you know? There’s room to screw up, and if there isn’t then it’s just not gonna work.

What was your most memorable moment while filming?

JK: The last scene where Gillian is watching her play, I didn’t expect that to move me so much.

Someone who’s so used to things being negative about them, that kind of stress and that sort of self loathing or whatever is never gonna move them as much as them achieving something.

That revealed something to me about her, which is that she probably doesn’t realize how capable she is and how professional she is. That’s, I don’t know why, but that moved me, watching it.

Source: Source: U Interview (US)

Hollywood Reporter reviews “Wild Honey Pie”

Hollywood Reporter reviews “Wild Honey Pie”

The Hollywood Reporter also reviewed Wild Honey Pie! and we can’t wait to see this new film with Jemima!

Jemima Kirke (‘Girls’) stars opposite Richard Elis in this low-key British comedy about marriage, sex and disappointment from writer-director Jamie Adams.

Writer-director Jamie Adams, whose résumé includes low-budget niche efforts such as Black Mountain Poets and Benny & Jolene, continues to explore the world of arty bohemian Brits with his latest, Wales-set lo-fi sex comedy Wild Honey Pie! Some of the players from the troupe of performers who have collaborated with Adams before pitch in again here, such as Alice Lowe (Sightseers) and former soap opera EastEnders regular Richard Elis. But for all intents and purposes, this is a vehicle for Jemima Kirke, erstwhile co-star of Girls. Playing an impulsive, semi-posh but abundantly tattooed toff whose carnal energy exerts a weirdly powerful gravitational pull on those around her, Kirke’s protagonist feels like someone we’ve met before. Basically, she’s a variation on Girls’ Jessa, but with fewer Yank inflections in the accent and slightly more focused ambitions.

A high tolerance for entitled millennials and their angst is a must for prospective viewers, especially ones willing to overlook shambolic plot maneuvers and frankly thinly-written characters, but the magic-hour shots of fetching Welsh beaches, well-meaning performances and a pretty soundtrack of indie tunes offer some compensations.

English Gillian (Kirke) and her Welsh husband Ollie (Elis) are, if not newlyweds, then at least not-long-weds in their late 20s/early 30s who haven’t quite launched themselves out of the nest. Living in a house on the coast not far from Cardiff that’s owned by Ollie’s mother (Joanna Scanlan) and seemingly decorated to appeal to impecunious AirBnB clients, they’re just about getting by. Ollie earns a pittance as a DJ once a week and spins discs at the occasional wedding. Gillian, meanwhile, is directing a production she wrote herself about a young married couple struggling to understand themselves. Or maybe it’s a play with Shakespeare monologues in it, judging by one rehearsal scene — it’s not easy to work out from the evidence presented.
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Source: Source: The Hollywood Reporter (US)

New interview by ‘Cultured Vultures’

Found one more interview with Jemima from when she was promoting Wild Honey Pie! at the SXSW Film Festival. This time it’s by Cultured Vultures and you can read it in our press archive.

Girls alumnus Jemima Kirke sat down with Cultured Vultures to discuss her new film, Wild Honey Pie, premiering at the 2018 SXSW Film Festival.

Thanks for joining us today. Your new film, Wild Honey Pie, premiered at SXSW. How much of a thrill is it to premiere the film at the festival?
I like SXSW. I’ve been here once before when I did Tiny Furniture so it’s kind of nice to come back.

So has the experience been fun?
Yeah. I’m only here for 24 hours.

So you don’t get to take in the full festival experience?
No, I only went to the premiere and stayed out late last night. I’m going home in a few hours.

After playing Jessa Johansson for six seasons, how different was it to play Gillian Walker in Wild Honey Pie and what was it that attracted you to Jamie Adams’ script?
It was completely different to play Gillian. It was much harder, actually. We have to flesh out a person in an hour and a half and change. In Girls, Jessa is revealed over the course of six seasons and because of that, you could take time in an episode just being sort of on the nose that are funny or say things that are so very Jessa — be a caricature of myself. I could that a lot. On this, it was more human I suppose.

Source: Source: Cultured Vultures (US)
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