Category: Magazine Alerts

More behind the scenes footage from “Stranger’s Kiss”

More behind the scenes footage from “Stranger’s Kiss”

Flaunt Magazine interviewed Alex Cameron on September 15, 2017 and they released some polaroid footage from behind the scenes of music video Stranger’s Kiss. Read and view photos below.

ALEX CAMERON TAKES US DEEPER INTO THE STORY BEHIND “STRANGER’S KISS” VIDEO WITH EVOCATIVE POLAROIDS

Alex Cameron is an Australian singer-songwriter who mixes acting and music in the character-driven vein of singer/raconteurs like Tom Waits and David Bowie; in his case taking on the persona of a motel-hopping, down-and-out urbanite plying his music in the grimy streets of New York City. This tendency towards character and story allows Alex to create a unique aesthetic that ties his music and his videos together into beautifully damaged pieces of brilliant storytelling. His voice and style seem like a natural fit for Angel Olsen, an acclaimed American singer-songwriter who has had dreams of becoming a pop star since she was young, and made good on those dreams with a series of mournfully gorgeous records conjuring worlds of love lost and beauty in pain.

As expected, Cameron and Olsen’s voices blend harmoniously together in the duet for “Stranger’s Kiss.” What wasn’t expected was the beautifully strange storyline for the visuals that Cameron and director/actress Jemima Kirke created to pair with the song. Cameron, appearing as a hustling subway busker, stars in the music video alongside Kirke, Cameron’s down-and-out admirer, who combs the city frantically for the man she loves. In the video, Kirke starts off on her own, carrying a folded photo of Cameron, displaying it for others to see out in the streets of New York. She eventually finds the musician in the photo at the subway train station, essentially doing the same thing she was doing–attempting to grab the attention of pedestrians passing through. The strangers end up finding comfort in each other’s familiarity and share a “Stranger’s Kiss”.

We had Alex continue his vision for the video’s story with a series of polaroids paired with poetic, eerie captions that show a romance blooming out of desperation in the grimy cracks between the city’s facade:


Jemima’s about the same height as my mother. I’ve got the same look as her father. There’s nothing wrong with two strangers getting what they need out of each other.
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New interview with ‘W Magazine’

Jemima was interviewed by W Magazine about her plans after Girls ending and about her work as an artist. They also took some lovely photos of Jemima herself as well as her studio in Brooklyn. View them here!

“I’ll sit here so I don’t get in trouble for smoking,” Jemima Kirke said on a recent morning, adjusting her paint-streaked apron so she could plop down onto a cushion by the window in her studio in Red Hook, Brooklyn. She lit an American Spirit, turned down the opera music a notch, and, having granted me entry by pushing a gigantic portrait of Allison Williams in her wedding dress away from the door, suggested I take an armchair where a wall used to stand before she and her studio-mate moved in.

Read full interview in our press archive.

Jemima in ‘So it Goes Magazine’

Jemima in ‘So it Goes Magazine’

Jemima is going to be featured in the new issue 9 of So It Goes Magazine. The photos have been taken by the talented photographer Ben Morris.

If anyone can get their hands on this magazine and can scan it for the site, that would be very appreciated! You can send it in through here.

The Hollywood Reporter – February 1, 2017 – Interview

The girls (and boys) of Girls were on the cover of The Hollywood Reporter on February 1, 2017. not only a good read but also 4 videos to watch of our favourite cast!

It’s Goodbye ‘Girls‘ as Lena Dunham, Cast, Execs Overshare in Show Oral History

The definitive backstory of a series that began as “the worst pitch you’ve ever read” (see it yourself!) as the seminal comedy starts its final season and all the major players spill on the (very NSFW) sex scenes, those racism charges and what the “voice of her generation” does next.

Turns out Lena Dunham’s introductory line in that very first episode of Girls — “I’m the voice of my generation … or at least a voice of a generation” — couldn’t have been more on the nose.

Over the past half-decade, Dunham’s millennial dramedy chronicling the lives of four 20-something women in New York has on more than one occasion seized the pop cultural conversation and steered it into areas that sometimes made even HBO uncomfortable. True, it never was an audience magnet — a typical season grossed between 4 million and 5 million weekly viewers — but it made up for that in buzz as it pushed the boundaries of casual nudity, gender identification and sexual mores and ignited controversies over everything from race to rape. With the series coming to an end with 10 final episodes beginning Feb. 12, HBO programming chief Casey Bloys jokes, “Lena Dunham single-handedly created the think piece industry.”

Dunham was all of 23 when she sold Girls to HBO with a page-and-a-half-long pitch that included nary a character nor a plot. Her only calling card? Tiny Furniture, a $50,000 indie film about a young woman who moves back home after college that Dunham wrote, directed and starred in, alongside her real-life friends and family. But the movie, which won the narrative film prize at the 2010 South by Southwest Film Festival, had some very big fans, including HBO’s then-entertainment president Sue Naegle and producer Judd Apatow.

After Tiny Furniture, Dunham had been pursued by independent studios looking to hook up for her next project. “Everyone was like, ‘There’s a YA novel that you might be good to adapt,’ ” she recalls. HBO in many ways was an unlikely place for the fledgling filmmaker to land. The premium cable channel had been better known for investing in bold-faced names — and for creating content for baby boomers rather than cable-cutting millennials. But Naegle and her then-27-year-old associate Kathleen McCaffrey had a hunch that a voice like Dunham’s could speak to an audience — and perhaps a generation.

Now, with Girls set to conclude, the cast — led by Dunham, 30, along with stars Jemima Kirke, 31 (as free spirit Jessa), Allison Williams, 28 (uptight Marnie), Zosia Mamet, 28 (earnest Shoshanna) and breakout Adam Driver, 33 (elusive Adam) — as well as executive producers Apatow and Jenni Konner, a cadre of executives and others reflect on six seasons that began with what Dunham describes as “the worst pitch you’ve ever read.”

Continue reading the interview and watch the videos in the press archive

Will the Girls Get Their Happy Endings? Lena Dunham Opens Up About the HBO Hit’s Series Finale

The cast of HBO’s GIRLS photographed on January 31st 2017 by Robyn Twomey for People Magazine in New York City
Girls Cast photographed at HBO Studios Jan 31, 2017 ©Robyn Twomey 2017

After six seasons, Lena Dunham’s Girls, the television touchstone for the millennial generation, will wrap up for good this spring. So will the characters all get the happy endings the viewers have been hoping for? Maybe … and maybe not.

“Every year I ask Lena if this is the one where Marnie will be fixed,” says Allison Williams, 28. “She’s always like, ‘Oh yeah because that’s what makes great TV — watching the girl who has it all figured out!’”

Jemima Kirke, 31, who plays Jessa, says that there won’t be any finality for her character. “But I don’t think I needed it,” she says. “It just needed to end for her somewhere.”

And although Dunham, 30, remains mum about what will happen to her character Hannah, the writer who’s perpetually at odds with where she’s going versus where she thinks she should be, she says at least one character will get the happy ending she always imagined.

“Zosia [Mamet], who plays Shoshanna, has the most traditionally happy ending because Shoshanna always dreamed of having that Sex and the City ending. So we wanted to give it to her. I cried during her last scene. It was like watching someone grow up.”

Says Mamet, 28: “The show is ending, but it’s not really wrapped up. It’s not supposed to feel final.”

The one thing Dunham can admit is that she will certainly be working with her costars again down the road, despite the show being over.

“Whenever I look at a project, I think of them and how they can be involved,” she says. “Because finding people you can be creative with? That’s harder than finding someone you can sleep with.”

Source: People