Category: Interviews

Clips from ‘Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen’

Several clips from the show ‘Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen’ on April 10, 2017.

The Hollywood Reporter – February 1, 2017 – Interview

The girls (and boys) of Girls were on the cover of The Hollywood Reporter on February 1, 2017. not only a good read but also 4 videos to watch of our favourite cast!

It’s Goodbye ‘Girls‘ as Lena Dunham, Cast, Execs Overshare in Show Oral History

The definitive backstory of a series that began as “the worst pitch you’ve ever read” (see it yourself!) as the seminal comedy starts its final season and all the major players spill on the (very NSFW) sex scenes, those racism charges and what the “voice of her generation” does next.

Turns out Lena Dunham’s introductory line in that very first episode of Girls — “I’m the voice of my generation … or at least a voice of a generation” — couldn’t have been more on the nose.

Over the past half-decade, Dunham’s millennial dramedy chronicling the lives of four 20-something women in New York has on more than one occasion seized the pop cultural conversation and steered it into areas that sometimes made even HBO uncomfortable. True, it never was an audience magnet — a typical season grossed between 4 million and 5 million weekly viewers — but it made up for that in buzz as it pushed the boundaries of casual nudity, gender identification and sexual mores and ignited controversies over everything from race to rape. With the series coming to an end with 10 final episodes beginning Feb. 12, HBO programming chief Casey Bloys jokes, “Lena Dunham single-handedly created the think piece industry.”

Dunham was all of 23 when she sold Girls to HBO with a page-and-a-half-long pitch that included nary a character nor a plot. Her only calling card? Tiny Furniture, a $50,000 indie film about a young woman who moves back home after college that Dunham wrote, directed and starred in, alongside her real-life friends and family. But the movie, which won the narrative film prize at the 2010 South by Southwest Film Festival, had some very big fans, including HBO’s then-entertainment president Sue Naegle and producer Judd Apatow.

After Tiny Furniture, Dunham had been pursued by independent studios looking to hook up for her next project. “Everyone was like, ‘There’s a YA novel that you might be good to adapt,’ ” she recalls. HBO in many ways was an unlikely place for the fledgling filmmaker to land. The premium cable channel had been better known for investing in bold-faced names — and for creating content for baby boomers rather than cable-cutting millennials. But Naegle and her then-27-year-old associate Kathleen McCaffrey had a hunch that a voice like Dunham’s could speak to an audience — and perhaps a generation.

Now, with Girls set to conclude, the cast — led by Dunham, 30, along with stars Jemima Kirke, 31 (as free spirit Jessa), Allison Williams, 28 (uptight Marnie), Zosia Mamet, 28 (earnest Shoshanna) and breakout Adam Driver, 33 (elusive Adam) — as well as executive producers Apatow and Jenni Konner, a cadre of executives and others reflect on six seasons that began with what Dunham describes as “the worst pitch you’ve ever read.”

Continue reading the interview and watch the videos in the press archive

Will the Girls Get Their Happy Endings? Lena Dunham Opens Up About the HBO Hit’s Series Finale

The cast of HBO’s GIRLS photographed on January 31st 2017 by Robyn Twomey for People Magazine in New York City
Girls Cast photographed at HBO Studios Jan 31, 2017 ©Robyn Twomey 2017

After six seasons, Lena Dunham’s Girls, the television touchstone for the millennial generation, will wrap up for good this spring. So will the characters all get the happy endings the viewers have been hoping for? Maybe … and maybe not.

“Every year I ask Lena if this is the one where Marnie will be fixed,” says Allison Williams, 28. “She’s always like, ‘Oh yeah because that’s what makes great TV — watching the girl who has it all figured out!’”

Jemima Kirke, 31, who plays Jessa, says that there won’t be any finality for her character. “But I don’t think I needed it,” she says. “It just needed to end for her somewhere.”

And although Dunham, 30, remains mum about what will happen to her character Hannah, the writer who’s perpetually at odds with where she’s going versus where she thinks she should be, she says at least one character will get the happy ending she always imagined.

“Zosia [Mamet], who plays Shoshanna, has the most traditionally happy ending because Shoshanna always dreamed of having that Sex and the City ending. So we wanted to give it to her. I cried during her last scene. It was like watching someone grow up.”

Says Mamet, 28: “The show is ending, but it’s not really wrapped up. It’s not supposed to feel final.”

The one thing Dunham can admit is that she will certainly be working with her costars again down the road, despite the show being over.

“Whenever I look at a project, I think of them and how they can be involved,” she says. “Because finding people you can be creative with? That’s harder than finding someone you can sleep with.”

Source: People

Inside ‘Inside the Actors Studio’: Backstage With James Lipton and the ‘Girls’ Cast

Inside ‘Inside the Actors Studio’: Backstage With James Lipton and the ‘Girls’ Cast

For the first time in 22 seasons, James Lipton let a journalist backstage at an ‘Inside the Actors Studio’ taping. With the Girls cast milling about, we talk about… everything.

There is a whirl of chaos that surrounds him on this frigid December night, roughly an hour before he’ll hit the stage to film the next Season 22 episode of Inside the Actors Studio. Lena Dunham, toting several bags and a respectable entourage, breezes by, chirping a giddy, “Hi! Hi! Hi!” to everyone as she passes.

People in headsets are shuttling Girls cast members into green rooms scattered in the hallway of Pace University—Dunham, along with co-stars Allison Williams, Jemima Kirke, and Zosia Mamet, will be the episode’s guests—while production assistants direct audience traffic and bustle around backstage in final preparations for the taping.

But standing calm in the middle of the storm is James Lipton. This is the 266th time he’s done this since 1994, after all, and he has his rituals.

“Rule number one: Turn off the cellphone,” he whispers to me in that regal articulation that, turns out, isn’t just for TV but Lipton’s everyday speech.

In a makeshift dressing room teeming with publicists, assistants, and sound guys manipulating his suit jacket to mic him up, he manages to lock eye contact with me, as if we’re the only people in the room and not surrounded by utter pandemonium.

“Rule number two: Tape down the mic,” he continues, his serenity suddenly interrupted by panic. His eyes dart around until he sees them: the roughly 10-inch stack of large blue index cards. His Bible, marked up with post-it tabs and highlighters and five hours of research for questions he plans to ask the Girls cast.
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Interview by StyleLikeU – January 17, 2017

Jemima Kirke Discusses The ‘Guilt’ She Felt At Becoming A Young Mother At 25

Women are expected to stay on-script.

In the early 1900s, gaslighting was a common way of forcing women to believe their feelings were invalid.

As recently as the 1950s, women were regularly given electro-shock therapy to combat for women who appeared to be “neurotic” after giving birth.

It wasn’t until celebrities like Brooke Shields and Lisa Rinna began sharing their stories of postpartum depression that it became socially acceptable to have it at all.

But even so, women have long been expected to feel the magical and instant bond with their newborn babies. Despite celebrities who have come forward, you don’t often hear new mothers complaining without adding, “but it’s the most meaningful thing I’ve ever done” at the end of the sentence.

This is why Jemima Kirke’s comments on motherhood are so important.

The “Girls” star sat down with the “What’s underneath?” project by Style Like U and got candid about being a young mother.

The “What’s underneath?” project has featured many powerful women, including CEOs, artists, actresses and musicians, and asks women on camera a series of questions, as they slowly remove their clothing piece by piece.

Kirke is gearing up for the premiere of the final season of “Girls,” airing on February 12. The 31-year-old also recently made headlines for announcing her split from her husband of seven years, Michael Mosberg.

The couple share two children together, Memphis and Rafella, who she gave birth to when she was just 25 years old.

The beginning of the interview breezes over light questions about “Girls” and common misconceptions people have of Kirke.

But it’s not until the interviewer asks about some of her personal insecurities that we see a shift in Kirke’s tone.

“I’m very insecure in my capabilities in parenting.”

She continues, “everyone says they’re not ready to have a baby, but I was not ready to have a baby. I really was not thinking about what I was doing, and I was doing it almost in the same way I’d get a haircut or a tattoo.”

“Everyone was like, oh Jemima’s fine because she’s married now and she’s having a baby.”

Jemima reveals she was fighting a severe inner struggle while she was about to become a mother, yet acknowledged that no one would have guessed it because she was doing everything a woman was “supposed” to be doing.

“The guilt hit me the second she came out of me, that I was her mother. I realized, oh my god, what did I just do? I just released a suffering person.”

Talking about motherhood is the only part of the video Jemima breaks down in. It’s clear the stresses and burdens (yes I’m going to use the word burden), of being a young mother can be complicated for anyone.

Even someone who appears to truly “have it all.”

Source: Elite Daily

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